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Cascade 10 Staking Plan

This WILL NOT turn a losing system in to a winning one. It may turn a system that wins small amounts at level stakes in to one that produces much better returns without all the usual stress and tension that seems to be inbuilt in to other staking plans – the stress and tension that psychologically plays doubting mind games with you and makes you question your own judgment. (Been there – done that – got bored - left!)

Here is the basic WIN BETTING excel sheet that we refer to throughout the explanation:

There is no expectation that you will fully appreciate the nuances of this approach on first read through.

The “break through moment” for most will probably be when you understand the difference in functions between column J, K and W – why they are different, how they mathematically interact, and why that’s the safety brake and the accelerator all in one!

It doesn’t matter how long or how many reads it takes you to “get it” – just as long as you do!

If I were trying to sum this up in one sentence, I’d describe the whole plan as a system of heavily modified all up (but it’s not!) win or place betting, using a repeating series of ten races, with a 1% of bank approach that almost guarantees rapid accumulation during “good trots” and a safety brake approach that limits losses during a “bad trot”. More precisely, it could be described as a series of 10 race to race doubles, either betting for a win or a place using one tenth of previous “base stake returns” as a multiplier.

Ah, BS, you scream – can’t be done.

THE SHEET SET UP:

Columns A to I are pretty self explanatory – it’s information you have to type in in sequential order to make things work on race days. We ALWAYS type in the A to F columns in full the day before. This stops you trying to type everything in as you go as that sort of time taking process, if you try to do it on race days while the action is taking place, almost certainly guarantees you will “muck things up”.

Columns H & I:
Naturally can’t be filled in until the race is run and the information can be inputted.

Column J:
This is where you work out your “base stake level” – it is 1%, rounded DOWN, always rounded down, of the total bank. However, it NEVER falls below your initial bet – ever – even to the point of bankruptcy which would take a long run of outs (100 to be precise) even from an initial starting point – and if you are using a system that has runs of outs of 100, what on earth are you doing?? So your base stake level is always 1% of your total bank rounded DOWN.

For example, if you are looking at the “Win” bets sheet, the base stake stayed at $10 until
line 25 when it went to $11 because line 24 pushed the bank up to $1100.

Note that the “Base Stake At 1%” does reduce from time to time as the bank falls but NEVER below your initial bet.

Column K: (Base Stake Ret)

On the win betting spread sheet the formula here at cell K3 is: =J3*H3
(This is then copied and pasted down the entire column K – for users new to excel this automatically happens when you select the cell then “Ctrl and C” then select the rest of the column by dragging the mouse down it and using the “Ctrl and V” function to paste it in.)

On the place betting spread sheet the formula here at cell K3 is: =I3*H3
(This is then copied and pasted down the entire column K – for users new to excel this automatically happens when you select the cell then “Ctrl and C” then select the rest of the column by dragging the mouse down it and using the “Ctrl and V” function to paste it in.)

This is the gross base stake return figure that is used to determine the exact return on the base stake portion of your overall bet – and the amount to be divided by ten and added to your next 10 bets to get the multiplier effect.

Huh? Yes – I know – read it again. This is the NUB of the system. Don’t go any further until you fully understand this.

It is best explained at, say, line 27 on the Win bet sheet demo– where the bet was on Cat’s Whisker. The base stake bet was $12 as the bank had moved to over $1200 but the total bet on the horse was in fact $27.00. (As we explain from here on in, the total bet was $27 because of the cascading effect of previous winning bets trickling down at 10%)

This means (and here is the good bit!) that while the total return on Cats Whisker was $262.80 (Col W multiplied by Col H) the amount re-invested on the next 10 selections was $87.60 (Col K) equally divided by 10 and added to events at lines 28 though 37. So even if the next 10 had have produced no winners the worst possible case scenario was that Cats Whisker still added $175.20 to the overall bank.

Now go and make a cup of tea or coffee, shake your head a few times, and then come back and read this again.

Okay – still not quite clear? Well let’s start at the start. If you’ve got the Win Bet spread sheet open the first bet is at line 3 on a needy called Mine. It loses – big deal – so do a lot of them! In fact we don’t strike a winner till line 12 when Madame Pedrille salutes and pays $1.80. (All bets stayed at $10 – remember – they never fall below the starting bet but may reduce from time to time at other points in accordance with the overall bank.)

So Madame Pedrille returns a gross $18.00 in column K. This is then divided by 10 ($1.80) and placed in the dbet1 column for each of the next ten races.

Ah, you say, where’s the safety angle here? It’s just all up betting!
No – this only happens when you are starting a new bank OR when you’ve had a run of outs of 11 or more that you actually re-invest all of the profit from a winning selection.

The next winner comes up at line 15 when Hillbilly Dancer salutes and pays $5.30. Now, as you can see from Column W, (which is always rounded UP), we actually had $12 on it and the return to bank was $63.60.

We then looked at Column K and see the base stake return was $53 so that gets dispersed at $5.30 for the next 10 bets and the bank net profits by $10 or thereabouts.

The next winner is at line 18 _ Pee Eye Cee_ $4.30 where the total bet on it was 22.00 – returned a gross $94.60 and only $43 was re-invested on the next ten selections so a net $51 added to the overall bank.

Ah – “I’m getting it” you say – great!

You see, really when you think about it, this is a straight 1% of bank level stakes system with the added benefit of a multiplier added for SOME of the winnings – and the 1% rises and falls in accordance with the overall bank as a safety brake.

And so it follows down the sheet – just one race after the other – the same 1% of overall bank base stake plus part winnings from the previous ten races – which in fact gives you up to ten running doubles at any time for either win or place.

So the next ten columns (11 on the place betting sheet) are simply the carry over amounts from winnings which all get added to the “base stake at 1%” to make up the total amount of the bet on each selection.

Now, the question on everyone’s lips – why are there 11 dbet “carry over” columns on the place betting sheet and only 10 on the win sheet? Simply because it is very possible to have ten winning place bets in a row and when that happens the carry down amounts tend to “crash” over each other which makes it difficult to follow – getting 10 “winners” in a row is a once in a blue moon event! (This is only a minor thing – worry about it when and if it happens)

Column V Win Betting Sheet:
On the Win Betting Sheet the formula to be inserted at cell V3 is: =J3+L3+M3+N3+O3+P3+Q3+R3+S3+T3+U3
(Copy and paste as outlined above to all cells in this column)

Column W Place betting Sheet:
On the Place Betting Sheet the formula to be inserted at cell WV3 is: =J3+L3+M3+N3+O3+P3+Q3+R3+S3+T3+U3+V3
(Copy and paste as outlined above to all cells in this column)

Why are these different? As explained above
These columns then total up the totals of the “base Stake at 1% of Bank” column and any carry down events from previous winning selections.

These are rarely in exact amounts ending in .00 or .50 cents so they need to be rounded UP in the next column (W on the win betting sheets and X on the place betting sheets) to arrive at your bet amount.

Column W on the Win Betting Sheet or Column X on the Place Betting Sheet:
This is the amount rounded up from the previous column to arrive at your bet amount for each race.
NOTE: This column is always rounded UP

Column X on the Win Betting Sheet or Column Y on the Place Betting Sheet:

This is a running total of the bank and where it stands after each race.
On the Win Betting sheet the formula to be inserted at cell X3 is:
=(X2-W3)+(W3*H3)
(Copy and paste as outlined above to all cells in this column)

What this does is calculates (the bank minus the rounded up bet) and then adds (the rounded up bet multiplied by the win dividend)

On the Place betting Sheet the formula to be inserted at cell Y3 is:
=(Y2-X3)+(X3*I3)
(Copy and paste as outlined above to all cells in this column)

What this does is calculates (the bank minus the rounded up bet) and then adds (the rounded up bet multiplied by the place dividend)

So there it is – the why it works and how it works for this staking system.

All TAB dividends are from a Victoria TAB account.

Would it work even more successfully on Betfair? Probably – depends how efficient you are at getting set. Remember, with Betfair, there is always the risk you won’t “get set” – with the TAB you are always “on”.

You will note that because of the greater number of dividends, the cascading effect of the place bets is far more intense than on the win system. Bear that in mind if you can’t deal emotionally with long runs of “outs”.

No staking plan can make up for plainly poor selections.

Disclaimer: Gambling on racing can be a very risky business and should only be undertaken with money you can comfortably afford to lose. RaceRate.com, or any of its associates or subsidiaries, cannot accept any responsibility for any loss occurred whatsoever in the use, or misuse, of information supplied